Walking and Observing

Macavity & Rudge

Macavity & Rudge

In the early days we used to walk the boundaries each morning, accompanied by our two cats, Rudge and Macavity.  We would marvel at what we now owned and make plans about the gardens we would create here.

Summer walk with the cats

Summer walk with the cats

Our daily walks were not just territory marking, although there was probably an element of that for us and the cats. They were observational field trips, helping us to acquaint ourselves with the land in all its detail. Getting to know what grew here, what thrived here, how the climate varied from one area to another.

As the autumn progressed and the overgrowth began to die down, on one of these walks we made an exciting discovery.

Macavity & Rudge explore our wood

Macavity & Rudge explore our wood

Our land didn’t end at the thick bank of nettles as we had thought, but continued down through a half acre strip of woodland.

This discovery was made even more exciting when the wood burst into flower in the spring, unexpectedly fulfilling our dream of having our own bluebell wood.

Our bluebell wood

Our bluebell wood

Lichen

Lichen – Evernia prunastri

Every day we discovered something new – a fungus, some lichen, a wild flower, a creature of some sort.

Young fox

Young fox

Whether by instinct or good fortune we found we had chosen land mostly surrounded by an organic livestock farm, and nestled comfortably into the High Weald, an officially designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.  The potential for gardening organically and attracting wildlife was therefore already pretty high before we started.

Badger

Badger

Almost from the beginning our late evenings and early mornings were filled with badgers, foxes, bats and owls. A vast improvement on the late night revellers of town living.

After our daily ‘beating the bounds’ we would return to the field armed with tape measures and bamboo canes and gradually mark out the gardens we were to create.

Virtual gardens

Virtual gardens

These virtual gardens were a clear vision to us in our minds’ eyes, but to friends and family they were just an incomprehensible forest of sticks, some leaning at jaunty angles, blown over by the wind, which must have looked like a hopeless dream.

The Planting Begins

By the time we got to our second winter here we were ready to start planting trees.

Inverewe Gardens

Inverewe Gardens

A friend with a smallholding in Herefordshire, and who was influential in our change of lifestyle, once told us that he wished he’d planted trees when they first moved in, and it was definitely at the top of our list of things to do. We had seen the principle of shelter illustrated in a number of places, but nowhere more starkly than at the gardens at Inverewe on the west coast of Scotland where, in the second half of the nineteenth century, Osgood Mackenzie turned an inhospitable promontory of rock – Am Ploc ard (the High Lump) into magnificent sub-tropical gardens (now owned by the National Trust for Scotland).  But only after planting a thick shelter belt of trees and waiting twenty years for them to grow!

Our garden in Eastbourne

Our garden in Eastbourne

Our first task, then, was to create shelter from the South Westerly winds which blasted across our plot, and that meant planting trees.  Our plot was nothing like as hostile as the conditions faced by Mackenzie at Am Ploc ard, but it was clear that things would struggle unless we could slow the wind down a bit.  We love trees.  In our previous garden – a 50 x 20 foot plot in Eastbourne, we managed to incorporate nine trees in our second design, despite our limited space.  These were necessarily small and largely trained varieties, including six cordon fruit trees, so we were looking forward to planting something a bit less restrained.

We were spurred on in our quest to plant trees by the discovery of English Woodlands, a local nursery specialising in trees and hedging, where you could buy trees as one year old whips – little more than sticks with a few roots on the end – in batches of 25, for a few pence each.  Even better, English Woodlands used to have a sale at the end of each winter when they cleared out their remaining stock at silly prices.

Planting the Spinney in early 1997

Planting the Spinney in early 1997

The Spinney today

The Spinney today

During that second winter and early spring we planted over 200 trees and shrubs. Most of these went into a new half-acre wood we call the Spinney, which connected our two existing bits of woodland and would eventually form the first line of defence from the prevailing winds, but we also planted a small birch grove, an avenue of wild cherry and small leaved lime, an orchard, various random tree and shrub plantings (some the result of impulse buys at the English Woodlands sale!) and four short lengths of hedge.  Some of these plantings have since been moved (mostly from amongst the random plantings), one or two have died but most have thrived.